roman unguentarium
roman unguentarium
 
roman unguentarium
 
roman unguentarium
 
roman unguentarium
 
roman unguentarium
 
roman unguentarium
 

82. Roman Aqua Colour Glass Unguentarium with Twine


C. 1st - 2nd Century A.D.

Now there's a rare thing! This is the second vessel from this Roman glass collection I'm listing and the first with what appears to be contemporary hemp? twine around the vessel. I have seen this before on vessels from sarcophagi and in tombs where the dry conditions allow for the preservation of organic material. It's certainly old. Twine was used to bind a group of vessels together, perhaps for use by the deceased in the afterlife. A lovely clear aqua greenish-blue Roman glass unguentarium vessel with a globular body and out-turned lip. Circa 1st - 2nd century A.D.

The collection represented one inhumation and this vessel would have contained perfumes and oils for the deceased (probably female). The glass is clear and the vessel well-formed. A nice example.


Condition: Complete and intact. Iridescent colours.

Dimensions: 6.6cm.

Provenance: Ex. private collection, Essex, UK. This vessel was part of a collection of Roman glass antiquities, including item 32, aquired in the early 20th century and remained in the same family for 3 generations.

£95.00

Unguentaria

Unguentaria are a type of Roman bottle made of free-blown glass. They were produced in large numbers across the Roman Empire and since they contained valuable liquids, were considered precious at the time and used both in private life and public ceremonies. They are frequent finds in archaeological contexts particularly in Roman cemeteries. The iridescence on ancient Roman glass was unintentional, and was caused by weathering on its surface. The extent to which a glass object weathers depends mainly on the burial conditions; however, the humidity, heat, and type of soil in which the glass was buried also all affect its preservation. In this case, the glass has preserved its original translucency.

Glass bottles were the preferred material for storing expensive liquids and medicines because they were non porous. The shaped body and mouth allowed the user to carefully pour and control the amount of liquid dispensed. By the 1st century AD, the technique of glass-blowing had revolutionised the art of glass-making, allowing for the production of small medicine, incense, and perfume containers in new forms. The liquids which filled these vessels would have come from all corners of the Roman Empire. This example has a nice shape with excellent clarity to the glass. A lovely piece.


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