roman glass unguentarium
roman glass unguentarium
 
roman glass unguentarium
 
roman glass unguentarium
 
roman glass unguentarium
 
roman glass unguentarium
 

52. Roman Pale Yellow Glass Unguentarium Vessel


C. 1st - 3rd Century A.D.

A lovely pale yellow glass Roman unguentarium vessel with elongated neck, rounded body and turned rim. Areas of iridescence. Circa. 1st - 3rd Century A.D.

This is the last of the glass vessels from the A.P. Fowler Collection and my personal favourite because of the lovely mellow yellow colour. An excellent addition to any collection of Roman glass.


Condition: Fine. No chips or cracks.

Dimensions: Height: 10cm Width: 5cm.

Provenance: From the private collection of the late A.P. Fowler of Wimbledon, London, UK; thence by descent to his grandson and auctioned in 2020. The collection includes hand-written records showing Mr Fowler was in Italy during the early spring of 1951, where he visited sites including Pompeii, Herculaneum and Palermo in Sicily.

£125.00

Roman Glass

Glassblowing developed in the Syro-Palestinian region in the early first century B.C. and came to Rome with craftsmen and slaves after the area's annexation to the Roman world in 64 B.C. The new technology revolutionized the Roman glass industry, stimulating an enormous increase in the range of shapes and designs that could be produced. Glassworker's were no longer bound by the technical restrictions of the casting process. Blowing allowed for unparalleled versatility and speed of manufacture. These advantages spurred an evolution of style, form and experimentation, leading craftsmen to create unique shapes; examples of which include flasks and bottles shaped like human heads, fruits and animals.


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